Tag Archives: Virginia

A Little Wicked Named to BookWorks “Back to School Recommended Reading” List for 2017!

What an exciting day! I received word that A Little Wicked had been named to the “Back to School Recommended Reading” list by BookWorks, a fabulous organization dedicated to Indie authors and their craft. Find the lists for all age groups here!

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Being named to a list like this is wonderful recognition for A Little Wicked but is also a great way to learn about other books recognized on the list. I am looking forward to a new reading list.

Thank you BookWorks!

 

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7 Reasons You Will Love Middle-Grade Historical Fiction

Good news! There may be a minimum age for reading middle-grade but there’s no maximum age.

Why will you love middle-grade historical fiction?

  1. Well-crafted novels – Charming characters and captivating settings are needed for quality historical fiction. Literature has standards, no matter the target age.
  2. Loads of action – Children are in front of screen an average of 5-7 hours per day (stat from Medlineplus.gov). Authors use action to grab and hold a middle-grader’s attention.
  3. Surprises – Who doesn’t love a good plot twist? Authors use this writing tool to keep readers guessing.
  4. Heart-wrenching scenes – A terrible accident leaving a character devastated or an unexpected kind gesture from an unexpected source. Childhood can be intense and confusing. Fictional childhoods are no different.
  5. Informative details – Historical fiction writers at all levels are serious about historic details.
  6. Fast-paced plots – Middle-grade novels keep the stakes high. Try to keep up!
  7. Smaller word counts – Smaller word-count plus fast-paced action makes most middle-grade historical fiction a quick read.  alittlewicked_williamsburgrl

Have a favorite middle-grade historical fiction novel? Please leave it in the comments.

Fun Lesson Plan for Middle-Grade Historical Fiction

Use historical fiction in the classroom as a tool for honing writing skills. This plan is useful after the class has read a middle-grade historical fiction novel together.

♦ Objective: Broaden students’ understanding of character motivation

♦ Activity: Create and compare two Motivation Maps

  • Draw the outline of a person on the board or with an overhead projector. You can use craft paper and make it life size.
  • Ask students to write personality traits of the main character inside the outline, one at a time.
  • Ask students to write outside influences on the main character outside the outline, one at a time. Include influences specific to the time period.
  • Have students draw the outline of a person on their own large sheet of paper.
  • Have them copy all the outside influences from the class outline to their own.
  • Ask students to write their own personality traits inside the outline.

♦ Discussion: Ask students how they would react differently than the main character did to the outside influences and why.

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Find more lesson plan ideas at Marcie Colleen’s website. Share your experiences in the comments.